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Dernière mise à jour : Mai 2018

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UR 1264 - MYCSA : Mycologie et securite des aliments

MycSA

Mycologie & Sécurité des Aliments
INRA Bordeaux-Aquitaine
BP 81
33883 Villenave d'Ornon Cedex

The world’s ten most feared fungi

12 November 2018

Conditions conductive to aflatoxin B1 contamination
A new article published in Fungal Diversity

MycSA contributed to this collective article, coordinated by Kevin Hyde

Hyde K.D., Al-Hatmi A.M.S., Andersen B., Boekhout T., Buzina W., Dawson Jr T.L., Eastwood D.C., Jones E.B.G. de Hoog S., Kang Y., Longcore J.E., McKenzie E.H.C., Meis J.F., Pinson-Gadais L., Rathnayaka A.R., Richard-Forget F., Stadler M., Theelen B., Thongbai B., Tsui C.K.M. (2018). The world’s ten most feared fungi. Fungal Diversity

https://doi.org/10.1007/s13225-018-0413-9

Abstract :

An account is provided of the world’s ten most feared fungi. Within areas of interest, we have organized the entries in the order of concern. We put four human pathogens first as this is of concern to most people. This is followed by fungi producing mycotoxins that are highly harmful for humans; Aspergillus flavus, the main producer of aflatoxins, was used as an example. Problems due to indoor air fungi may also directly affect our health and we use Stachybotrys chartarum as an example. Not everyone collects and eats edible mushrooms. However, fatalities caused by mushroom intoxications often make news headlines and therefore we include one of the most poisonous of all mushrooms, Amanita phalloides, as an example. We then move on to the fungi that damage our dwellings causing serious anxiety by rotting our timber structures and flooring. Serpula lacrymans, which causes dry rot is an excellent example. The next example serves to represent all plant and forest pathogens. Here we chose Austropuccinia psidii as it is causing devastating effects in Australia and will probably do likewise in New Zealand. Finally, we chose an important amphibian pathogen which is causing serious declines in the numbers of frogs and other amphibians worldwide. Although we target the top ten most feared fungi, numerous others are causing serious concern to human health, plant production, forestry, other animals and our factories and dwellings. By highlighting ten feared fungi as an example, we aim to promote public awareness of the cost and importance of fungi.